This topic contains 7 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Andy 20 minutes ago.

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  • #12604

    Filipe
    Participant

    Hey everyone… My question is about chemical residue on grass clippings. I live next to a park, the grass is cut regularly and is left to dry there. I’m tempted to use it as carbon for my compost because I’m really lacking it at the moment. I am concerned though that any spray used there may eventually transfer to my food if used in my compost. What do you guys think??
    Thanks

    #12648

    Justin
    Participant

    Hey Filipe, To answer your question I would have to suggest you don’t worry about the Chemical residue. our world is so penetrated by these sorts of substances that it has become virtually impossible to avoid them entirely. I say use the waist of this world to build a new one.

    good luck.

    #12662

    Filipe
    Participant

    Thanks for your reply Justin… Yeah maybe I’m worrying too much…
    I emailed the council about what kind of spray they use.. so let’s see what they say.
    Good luck on your endeavors too.

    #12956

    William
    Participant

    Hello, Filipe. I have killed garden plants by using grass clippings as a mulch, and left a vacuum which was quickly filled with fire ants. I have also heard of manure from horses fed herbicide treated hay ruining gardens even after composting. So I strongly advise against the use of any grass clippings in the garden.

    #12990

    Filipe
    Participant

    Cheers Willian! I haven’t used it yet and after your comment I don’t think I will… I appreciate your help.

    #13032

    Elmer
    Participant

    Mix the grass clippings with dry leaves and find a place in your yard to pile it up. If you don’t find any worms in it after about 4 months, you probably don’t want to use it.

    #13071

    Filipe
    Participant

    Cool …Thanks Elmer

    #13292

    Andy
    Participant

    If you have used fresh grass clippings, there is a high chance the resultant nitrogen drawdown in the soil has contributed to the demise of your plants. I wouldn’t automatically conclude that it was due to chemical residues. Also use of lawn clippings can prevent water penetration. Better to mix it up with other (coarser) organic matter.

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