This topic contains 4 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Jude 2 weeks, 5 days ago.

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  • #6925

    Satyr
    Participant

    So, I’m moving back to live with my mum and my friend (who is also my old roomie, and good friend) and will hopefully be taking over part of the yard to put into practice what I’ve learned… There’s just one problem. The roomie has a dog, and she spoke about how he used to pee on her tomato plants.

    I’m a little worried about this. Are there plants that are good at breaking down urine? Other than fencing, is there a way to keep his piddling from killing off what ever plants that happen to be in range of the downpour?

    #6926

    Satyr
    Participant

    My mum, and her roomie (also a good friend)*

    #8022

    Joan
    Participant

    Dogs are a problem in a small area or even 3 acres like we have. We fence our gardens and plants. The urine is fertilizer in small amounts no?

    #8966

    Brandon
    Participant

    Watching Geoff Lawton’s videos, he frequently has two dogs (not sure if he has more) by his side. Their urine definitely has nutrients. Just make sure to keep them out of areas you don’t want them in (kitchen garden, herb spiral, etc.).

    #11954

    Jude
    Participant

    We use raised beds in our yard to address this problem (four dogs); the dogs pee on the bed edging but the plants are OK. The urine of male dogs seems to be very high in urea (ammonia smell) which can burn plants, however the smell of the urine on the bed surrounds discourages possums and bandicoots at night (when the dogs are locked up) and the wandering dogs themselves discourage diurnal predators such as crows and my ducks. My dogs are trained not to chase animals but they still smell like predators, so wild animals steer clear of their territory.

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