Home Forums Permaculture Discussion Forum home made white glue and starter pots

This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  diana 3 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #5875

    jim
    Participant

    We Googled “make white glue”,and founded several sites that tell us to mix 2% milk and vinegar, strain the whey and denature the curd with baking soda.

    Next we collected a bit of soil from the yard and put the glue in the soil stirred thoroughly then pressed the mix into a shallow mold. Our object here is to make some plant starter pots.
    The instructions say it takes 6 hours for the glue to dry and it was about five minuets ago that we did this. Photos will follow in a later post.

    i made a, 4 oz. of milk batch; then glued two thin popsicle sticks together, a bit of paper to some chip board and mixed with the rest a cup of soil. The soil is high humus coming from a layer of mulch covering a sheet of, plastic sheeting weed stopping junk, found in the yard of an apartment complex where i happen to find myself on this Fourth of July.
    The aim is to make a little pot that can be used to start seeds and then move to the ground. Like the ones you can buy. Now one might say seed balls can do just that with out the fuss i have just described and i would be one to say that too. but listening to Larry has made me think why not just try this better than sitting doing a lot thinking and wondering besides this will probably not work not enough glue. Also the real inspiration for this comes from looking for a way to stabilize calcined limestone (plaster of paris) to make more durable plaster bound hypertufa.

    Oh and by the way, plaster of paris or gypsum, the stuff found in drywall, when heated to around 1300 f becomes “calcined” (the chemical water is driven off) when it is ground to a powder it can be remixed with water and poured into a mold and cast to your liking.

    good diggin

    jim

    • This topic was modified 4 months ago by  jim.
    #5887

    Adrian Woods
    Participant

    Cardboard egg trays!

    #5889

    jim
    Participant

    ha ha yes, card board egg trays work supper good for exactly the use we are talking about in fact that is what i used to mold the the little pots i made and thought while making them that why do this when we have the egg cartons. My answer is those egg cartons come from the industrial food world and there is good reason to believe may be in a later stage of secession.
    Plus the other hypertufa stuff this research is poking around at.

    jim

    #5893

    Adrian Woods
    Participant

    Same sort of theme: dumping “cotton” and jeans in the mulch.

    I used to make paper by hand and discovered that rags have to be from old clothes to put them in the pulp. Lots of “cotton” T-shirts have a nylon content. Each “cotton” thread is 3 or 4 ply and one of the plys may be a nylon or other plastic yarn.

    Self adhesive envelopes and stickers with those peel-off backs and junk mail with the little plastic envelopes are all no-nos for pulp and compost. That said, there is something perverse about using all those capitalist advertising fliers (not the glossy ones) and flat screen plasma TV boxes for mulching and composting.

    #5895

    Adrian Woods
    Participant

    b.t.w. Egg cartons should be “food grade” and thus non-toxic.

    No-work ethic: Peeling cellotape off cardboard boxes a drag? Leave out in the rain and when the box is soggy, it will fall off on its own!

    #6058

    Scott
    Participant

    Paper pots made from old newspapers.

    #6197

    diana
    Participant

    Don’t forget the toilet paper rolls. If you cut them in half, they make great seed starters. Paper towel rolls work just as well.

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